Monday, March 27, 2017

Wildwood Park, Appling, Georgia


Wildwood Park is a County campground in eastern Georgia. It is located on Thurmond Lake (also known as Clarks Hill Lake), which, they say, is 71,000 acres and is the largest man-made lake east of the Mississippi River. They hold multiple fishing tournaments and is home of the International Disc Golf Center & Hall of Fame, with three championship disc golf courses.

 http://followusinourtravels.blogspot.com/   http://followusinourtravels.blogspot.com/   http://followusinourtravels.blogspot.com/ 

There are 61 campsites with 50 and 30 amp electrical with water hookups. There is a dump station. Verizon worked well and we received about 12 TV channels. There is free wifi. We were in site 30, which is a pull-through site in Area 1. There are only 7 pull-through sites. There are 3 camping areas. They do take reservations, but we were able to get a site without one on a Saturday. I did call ahead Saturday morning and they said they had some openings which we would could fit in. Regular cost is $20/night, senior over 62 $18.

http://followusinourtravels.blogspot.com/   http://followusinourtravels.blogspot.com/   http://followusinourtravels.blogspot.com/  http://followusinourtravels.blogspot.com/   http://followusinourtravels.blogspot.com/   http://followusinourtravels.blogspot.com/  http://followusinourtravels.blogspot.com/  http://followusinourtravels.blogspot.com/  http://followusinourtravels.blogspot.com/ 

The weather was nice, did get a little bit of rain, and the people and dogs weren’t real noisy. What was noisy was a parrot that a lady had in a cage outside on the picnic table. It kept saying “hello” over and over, and would whistle some times. Who would have thought?!

For more pictures, please click here.





Georgia


We weren’t able to get a Welcome to Georgia sign as we were on a small county road when when crossed over. As you can see by our pictures, we tend to stay off of interstate highways as we can see more of the countryside. Well, this time my iPhone and the GPS did not agree at all, and we took some smaller roads, but paved. Georgia brings more timber, more farming, more red soil and more spring blooms.

You can click on any of the pictures to enlarge them.

http://followusinourtravels.blogspot.com/   http://followusinourtravels.blogspot.com/   http://followusinourtravels.blogspot.com/  http://followusinourtravels.blogspot.com/   http://followusinourtravels.blogspot.com/   http://followusinourtravels.blogspot.com/

We were suppose to cross this railroad track. It was so steep, I can’t imagine how much we’d scrape if we did. Luckily there was another road we could take beside the tracks and cross it about a block away that was level. http://followusinourtravels.blogspot.com/ 
http://followusinourtravels.blogspot.com/  http://followusinourtravels.blogspot.com/  http://followusinourtravels.blogspot.com/     

 We also went to Jarrell Plantation in Georgia and stayed at Wildwood Park in Georgia. I have done separate blog posts for them.

You can click here for more pictures. 



Saturday, March 25, 2017

Jarrell Plantation, Juliette, Georgia


Jarrell Plantation is a State Historic State near Juliette, GA. The visitor center has a museum, gift shop and movie. there are plantation buildings, a picnic area and a small parking lot, but does have a couple sites set for bus/RVs. It is only open on Thursday, Friday and Saturday and does have an entrance fee. The do have Saturday events and demonstrations.

You can click on any of the pictures to enlarge them.

http://followusinourtravels.blogspot.com/
http://followusinourtravels.blogspot.com/  http://followusinourtravels.blogspot.com/  http://followusinourtravels.blogspot.com/  

This cotton plantation was owned by a single family for more than 140 years. There were three houses built. The 1920 house, which is not part of the tour, is now a Bed & Breakfast. The houses here aren’t fancy, like many people imagine plantation houses. This is more typical of the Georgia plantations with slaves.

http://followusinourtravels.blogspot.com/  http://followusinourtravels.blogspot.com/  http://followusinourtravels.blogspot.com/ 

In 1860, the 600-acre plantation was farmed by 39 slaves. After the Civil War, John Jarrell increased his land to nearly 1,000 acres farmed by former slaves. In 1895, Dick, John’s son, added a sawmill, cotton gin, gristmill, shingle mill, planer, sugar cane press, syrup evaporator, workshop, barn and outbuildings. In 1974, his descendants donated these buildings to establish Jarrell Plantation Historic Site.

http://followusinourtravels.blogspot.com/  http://followusinourtravels.blogspot.com/  http://followusinourtravels.blogspot.com/ http://followusinourtravels.blogspot.com/  http://followusinourtravels.blogspot.com/  http://followusinourtravels.blogspot.com/ 

For more pictures of this historic site, please click here.